Question: What Caused The Spanish Flu?

How did the 1918 flu spread?

influenza pandemic of 1918–19: temporary hospital Influenza is caused by a virus that is transmitted from person to person through airborne respiratory secretions.

An outbreak can occur if a new strain of influenza virus emerges against which the population has no immunity..

Was there a cure for the Spanish flu?

Fighting the Spanish Flu When the 1918 flu hit, doctors and scientists were unsure what caused it or how to treat it. Unlike today, there were no effective vaccines or antivirals, drugs that treat the flu. (The first licensed flu vaccine appeared in America in the 1940s.

How many people did Spanish flu kill?

50 million peopleThe 1918 H1N1 flu pandemic, sometimes referred to as the “Spanish flu,” killed an estimated 50 million people worldwide, including an estimated 675,000 people in the United States.

What started the Spanish flu?

Historian Mark Humphries of Canada’s Memorial University of Newfoundland says that newly unearthed records confirm that one of the side stories of the war—the mobilization of 96,000 Chinese laborers to work behind the British and French lines on World War I’s Western Front—may have been the source of the pandemic.

Does the Spanish flu still exist?

‘The 1918 flu is still with us’: The deadliest pandemic ever is still causing problems today. In 1918, a novel strand of influenza killed more people than the 14th century’s Black Plague. At least 50 million people died worldwide because of that H1N1 influenza outbreak. … But the strand of the flu didn’t just disappear.

Is there a vaccine for the Spanish Flu?

There were no vaccines for the Spanish flu and there are currently no vaccines for COVID-19.

What country was most affected by the Spanish flu?

The first occidental European country in which the pandemic spread to large sectors of the population, causing serious mortality, was Spain. The associated influenza provoked in Madrid a mortality rate of 1.31 per 1000 inhabitants between May and June (1918).

Where did the 1918 Spanish flu originated?

While it’s unlikely that the “Spanish Flu” originated in Spain, scientists are still unsure of its source. France, China and Britain have all been suggested as the potential birthplace of the virus, as has the United States, where the first known case was reported at a military base in Kansas on March 11, 1918.

What age group was most affected by the Spanish flu?

Read about the 1918 influenza pandemic and progress made in preparedness and response. Mortality was high in people younger than 5 years old, 20-40 years old, and 65 years and older. The high mortality in healthy people, including those in the 20-40 year age group, was a unique feature of this pandemic.

What was the worst outbreak in history?

20 of the worst epidemics and pandemics in historyFlu pandemic: 1889-1890. … American polio epidemic: 1916. … Spanish Flu: 1918-1920. … Asian Flu: 1957-1958. … AIDS pandemic and epidemic: 1981-present day. … H1N1 Swine Flu pandemic: 2009-2010. … West African Ebola epidemic: 2014-2016. … Zika Virus epidemic: 2015-present day.More items…•

What animal caused the Spanish flu?

The 1918 influenza pandemic caused an estimated 50 million to 100 million deaths worldwide. The virus that caused the 1918 influenza pandemic probably sprang from North American domestic and wild birds, not from the mixing of human and swine viruses.

How did the Spanish flu kill so many?

Much of the high death rate can be attributed to crowding in military camps and urban environments, as well as poor nutrition and sanitation, which suffered during wartime. It’s now thought that many of the deaths were due to the development of bacterial pneumonias in lungs weakened by influenza.

How long did Spanish flu pandemic last?

While the global pandemic lasted for two years, a significant number of deaths were packed into three especially cruel months in the fall of 1918. Historians now believe that the fatal severity of the Spanish flu’s “second wave” was caused by a mutated virus spread by wartime troop movements.